Online general studies bachelor's degree graduate presenting work to colleagues

Marketing & Communication Online Bachelor’s Degree Program

Format

100% Online

24/7 Access to Coursework

Cost per Credit

$318 Through Summer '22

$328 Fall '22 - Summer '23

$250 Active Duty Military

Credit Hours Required

Apply By

Aug. 19, 2022

Classes Start

Sept. 5, 2022

Explore Marketing & Communication

In today's increasingly complex business world, integrated marketing and communications professionals with diverse, interdisciplinary skillsets are in high demand. Designed for working adults, Champlain's B.S. in marketing and communication online degree will equip you with essential digital marketing, content strategy, technology, critical thinking and creative skills that prepare you for the modern workplace and allow you to adapt as organizations evolve.

 

Differentiate Your Marketing Degree

Choose between two areas of focus:

  • Digital Marketing: Develop your skills in marketing analytics, web design and development principles, and writing for the web
  • Content Strategy: Explore communication tactics, social media, principles of persuasion and design

Earn Digital Marketing Certifications Along the Way

You'll emerge from the program with digital marketing certifications from Google Analytics, Google Ads and Hubspot Inbound, eMail and Content, as well as in-demand soft skills such as leadership and problem-solving that you can carry with you through your career.

Build Your Career Future

Our online bachelor's degree in integrated marketing communications provides you with the knowledge and subject matter expertise necessary to succeed in fast-growing careers in marketing and communications, in fields such as advertising, brand management, public relations, and digital marketing.

Take the next step

Academic Excellence and Recognition

New England Commission of Higher Education Logo

Regionally accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education

US News & World Report Best Online Bachelor's Degree Programs

Ranked among the Best Online Bachelor’s Programs by U.S. News & World Report

Military Friendly School Badge

Designated as a Military Friendly School for our commitment to the military community

Ranked amount the best online colleges by Intelligent.com

Named the Best Private Online College by Intelligent.com

What Can You Do With A Degree In Marketing?

Marketing and communication occupations are projected to grow 10% from 2020 to 2030 and proprietary research conducted by Education Advisory Board (EAB) using Emsi Analyst™ for Champlain College Online found that the need for market researchers and marketing specialists will increase 40% in that same time period. The median annual salary for these occupations is $141,490.*

Graduates of Champlain's online marketing and communication degree online program will be prepared for a variety of marketing and communications roles in fields such as the areas of advertising, brand management, public relations, and digital marketing.

*Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 2020; job titles: The Balance, 2020

Top Jobs for Bachelor's in Marketing & Communication Graduates

  • Brand/Product Manager
  • Marketing Manager
  • Media Planner
  • Market Research Analyst
  • Marketing Specialist
  • Public Relations Specialist
  • Sales Representative
  • Social Media Manager
Online communications bachelor's degree graduate collaborating with colleague in office meeting

Program Details

Learn more about Champlain's 100% online marketing and communication bachelor's degree, designed for working professionals.

Champlain's online marketing and communication courses encompass the top skills needed by today's marcomm professionals. Graduates of the program are required to complete the following courses.

Marketing & Communication Courses (45 Credits)

Area of Concentration (15 Credits) 

General Education Courses (30 Credits)

Science Literacy (3 Credits)

Human Thought & Creative Expression (6 Credits)

Human Behavior & Social Institutions (3 Credits) 

General Electives (19 Credits) 

Professional Courses (45 credits):

This class is designed to provide students who have little or no digital video production knowledge with an introduction to methods and strategies for production of digital video stories. Using the art of telling a story, the class will create educational, informational or personal experience video productions utilizing audio, video, storyboard, scriptwriting and digital editing techniques

This course is an historical overview, and examination of the evolution of digital, film, and print media, and their functions. Students will identify and analyze contemporary problems of the media such as the legal, social, economic and psychological implications of their relationships with society. They also will examine the ways in which marketing and PR professionals utilize the mass media channels to reach their intended target audiences.

The American Marketing Association defines Marketing as the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large. In this course, students will learn marketing terminology and principles including the marketing mix, marketing segmentation and how external forces impact marketing strategy as well as how marketing fits into the organization.The impact of ethical issues, diversity, globalization and social responsibility on marketing decisions will also be examined.

This course focuses on the field of public information and public relations, with an emphasis on applying the appropriate theories and techniques to solve organizational and institutional communications problems.Students will learn how the field of public relations fits into the overall marketing and communication strategy for an organization.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-200

Understanding financial statements and how to interpret them is important to all those working in businesses. In this course students learn the relationship among financial statements; study how to interpret this information and to apply this understanding in real-world contexts; and learn how to use financial information to help make sound management decisions.

This course provides insight into consumer behavior, and how consumers engage in the decision making process, including an in-depth study of the internal, external, and situational influences on consumer behavior such as culture, learning, personality and lifestyle, values and motivations. Students will learn to assess current brands' marketing strategies with respect to consumer behavior and will apply their knowledge of consumer behavior to the development of buyer personas for a client organization.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-200

Project Management is the formal application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project-based activities to meet organizational requirements. Project management is accomplished through the use of processes such as Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing. Project managers can divide projects into these phases to provide better management control with appropriate links to the ongoing operations of the organization. Collectively, these phases, known as the project life cycle, form the foundation for the practice of project management and are guided by the Body of Knowledge from the Project Management Institute (PMI).

New product or service development is a creative process. When done well, it creates a culture of innovation identified by interaction among multiple organizational functions. Students are introduced to the complexity of the process and to the systems needed to manage it. They will explore steps in the process including generating ideas, developing the concept as well as analyzing and evaluating it. Students will also consider the increasing pressure to adapt products/services to foreign markets.

Prerequisites

MKTG-200

Through a mix of strategy, professional certification, and hands-on application students will delve into the digital marketing ecosystem and best practices in the discipline. Students will utilize digital platforms as part of a comprehensive and integrated marketing strategy. Students will work with an organization to conduct a digital audit and provide digital marketing recommendations.

Prerequisites

MKTG-200 or MKT-110

This course explores the promotional elements that can form the foundation of an integrated marketing communications campaign. Students will develop a resonant, data-driven and ethically sound Integrated Marketing Communications campaign for a real-world brand. Considering target audience analysis, marketing objectives, and situational context, they will design a strategic IMC campaign including the development of a positioning statement, big idea/theme, message strategy, media plan, and evaluation plan.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-200

Uncover and develop creativity by participating in exercises and experiences that guide students through an exploration of various methods of non-traditional thinking. Students use creative thinking to imaginatively solve problems. Both individual and group techniques are used.

Prerequisites

Must complete 60 credits before taking this course.

Students will learn the various forms of public relations writing and will develop competency in written communications for different media including print, digital and audiovisual formats. Students will conduct research and audience analysis, establish communications goals, execute the communications plan, and evaluate the total communication effort. Students will apply research, public relations writing, design, production, copy disseminations, and media to produce a complete media kit.

Prerequisites

Complete MKCM-210

Finding and utilizing the right data and information to help with business decision-making - this skill is indispensable to any business professional, no matter the field or discipline of business. Students learn how to find data - the right data - efficiently and accurately, using advanced search methods. Students will harness major resources and utilize databases, government resources, and financial websites. Students will also learn to utilize a system for developing research questions, choosing the right resources to substantiate a research plan and evaluate and organize business data into useful forms.

Students will examine the role Strategic Communication professionals play in helping corporate, nonprofit and government organizations, and individuals in the public sphere to successfully manage crises through optimal use of communication theory and best practices. Students develop an understanding of the crucial role traditional and social media play in crisis management. The primary focus will be on real-world examples and case studies.

Prerequisites

Complete MKCM-210

In this capstone course students will integrate and apply what they have learned in their Marketing and Communication program by developing a fully integrated marketing communications campaign, through planning, strategic and tactic development, research, and evaluation. Students will also develop team participation and presentation skills.

Prerequisites

Complete all required program courses in the Marketing and Communication program

Digital Marketing Track (15 credits):

This course introduces students to the fundamental language of visual form and basic skills including the industry-standard software applications used to create, acquire, and manipulate digital images. Students will learn about two-dimensional composition and design, color theory and terminology, and will apply these principles to a variety of basic design projects. Color, form and content will be explored in terms of cultural, psychological, physiological, and historical aspects.

From storyboard to form creation, students walk through the steps to create a basic four to five-page website to specification in this course that introduces HTML5 and CSS. Hands-on assignments reinforce skills development and best practices in design: navigation, column layout, image editing and usage, fonts and tables.

In this advanced level digital marketing course, working with live client projects, students will learn how to analyze and interpret digital marketing analytics data from multiple platforms, visualize complex data for reporting to various audiences and make data-driven recommendations. Additionally, students will receive industry standard Google Analytics certification.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-250

Students will expand on what they learned in Intro to Digital Marketing by moving beyond making recommendations to actually running various aspects of digital marketing campaigns. Students will earn industry standard certifications and work with a live client project to implement digital marketing strategies and tactics. Students will learn the privacy, ethical and legal implications of utilizing digital tools.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-250

Choose One For The Digital Marketing Track

Complex web page designs fully utilized all the functionality provided by the browser. In this course, students complete a variety of hands-on assignments as part of a redesign of an existing site. One week they recreate a page using appropriate HTML5 tags, while in another they implement drag and drop functionality that must work when the site is displayed in the Chrome browser. Later in the course, students animate transitions and build a basic responsive version of the site.

Prerequisites

WEBD-125

Great websites are created with specific audiences in mind and are the culmination of a process that includes creating messaging and developing a strategy that maps out the best content and functionality to reach the audience and influence its behavior. In this course, students begin with a SWOT analysis and development of a mission statement, and then create a sitemap and content, before publishing a website and blog.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112

An organization's community manager must be a community advocate and brand evangelist, who has savvy communication skills, can create content on multiple platforms, gather community input and measure success. Students will learn how to manage multiple online communities for an existing brand utilizing best practice strategy and tactics and will explore the difference between social media management and community management. Students will apply course learning and industry standard certification experience to a client-based project.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-250.

Content Strategy Track (15 credits):

In this hands-on design course, students will plan, design, typeset, produce artwork, proof, and manage production for brochures, posters, and other communication collateral materials. Students will learn the basic language of design and the overall production process-all to help produce projects or work with design and production professionals to produce complex projects. Some basic art supplies will be required.

This hands-on content production class examines and creates audio and video for an evolving variety of social media platforms. Students will examine, question, critique, draft, and revise text, audio, and video created for specific target audiences.

Prerequisites

Take MKCM-101

This course examines persuasive communication in a variety of contexts (interpersonal, group, public) and media (face to face, computer mediated, traditional mass media). Topics will include classical rhetorical theory, social psychology theories, audience analysis, ethics, credibility and power. Students will apply contemporary persuasive strategies used in marketing communications, content marketing, interpersonal communications, and sales to produce a persuasive content marketing campaign.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-200

Students will explore the legal context of communication through the mass media in the United States. Students will become familiar with US legal code as it applies to media and digital technologies. Students will develop the ability to analyze the important legal, ethical and policy issues related to the mass media.

Prerequisites

Complete MKCM 120 and MKTG 200 or permission

An organization's community manager must be a community advocate and brand evangelist, who has savvy communication skills, can create content on multiple platforms, gather community input and measure success. Students will learn how to manage multiple online communities for an existing brand utilizing best practice strategy and tactics and will explore the difference between social media management and community management. Students will apply course learning and industry standard certification experience to a client-based project.

Prerequisites

Complete MKTG-250.

General Education Courses (30 credits):

This course draws on fundamental concepts of contemporary communication research to help students identify and develop strategies to become effective and versatile communicators across media and settings. Students will examine and respond to a range of interpersonal situations through the critical evaluation of the three essential components of all communication: its purpose, audience, and context. Students will leave the course with the ability to reflect on and adapt their strategies to successfully and consistently communicate for a range of purposes across diverse settings.

This course draws on fundamental concepts of contemporary group communication research to help students identify and develop strategies to communicate effectively in small groups and teams for the cooperative purpose of advancing common goals. Students will draw on listening and responding strategies learned in COMM-130 Interpersonal Communication and apply them to communicating as a leader or member of a small group. They will also learn how to recognize and manage the types of conflicts that can arise in small groups. Prerequisite: COMM-130 Interpersonal Communication

Prerequisites

Complete COMM-130

Students will learn to navigate the rapidly changing nature of communication in the digital age, exploring electronically-mediated communication platforms, social networks, and online social media, while applying specific communication theories in order to determine best practices. Through reading, discussion, and assignments, students will work to overcome online communication barriers and gain a critical understanding of which tools are effective in which situations.

Prerequisites

Take COMM-130 Interpersonal Communication

This course introduces students to the foundational concepts needed to communicate effectively in writing for academic study and professional development. Students will learn how to use the four stages of the writing process--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--to create written communication that meets its intended purpose for its intended audience. Students will also be introduced to rhetorical modes and their role in the development of written communication. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement.

This course builds on students' proficiency in the writing process and rhetorical modes to introduce the use of evidence from sources in written communication. Students will learn to determine the need for evidence from sources, identify types of information resources, develop effective search strategies, and incorporate evidence from sources in written communication legally and ethically. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement.

Prerequisites

Complete ENGL-100 with a minimum grade of C or better

This course will introduce students to major streams of social justice thought, including historical social justice movements, theoretical problems having to do with social equality, personal freedom, marginalization, and stigmatization, and the ways in which civic and professional communities respond to these issues.

Mathematical reasoning, when applied to everyday and professional lives, has two dimensions: logic for deterministic situations and probabilities for non-deterministic situations. This course aims to help students develop these mathematical reasoning skills.

Accurate and appropriate visual data representation is increasingly critical in today's work environments. Students will develop skills in data organization, manipulation and interpretation in a way that supports data-driven decision-making and effective communication of numerical data

Choose One:

This course builds on students' proficiency in using evidence from sources to support their own prior knowledge to using evidence from sources to develop persuasive communication for a range of purposes, including solving problems and pursuing opportunities in the workplace, in addition to academic study. Students will learn to articulate effective inquiry questions, recognize errors in logic, interpret the validity of persuasive communication created by others, and develop effective persuasive communication of their own using evidence from sources. The role of accurate citation of sources in persuasive communication will also be addressed. A minimum grade of C is required for this course to meet a general education requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL-100 The Writing Process & ENGL-110 Introduction to Using Evidence from Sources in Writing.

Prerequisites

Complete ENGL-100 and ENGL-110 with a minimum grade of C.

In this course, adult students demonstrate skills and knowledge from work and other life experiences in order to request credit for a specified degree requirement. Students use the conceptual framework of argumentation to make a logical case for credit in an e-portfolio. The portfolio will identify the context for the student's learning in the subject matter, trace its progression over time, and explain how the learning is equivalent to the specified CCO degree requirement. The student will then demonstrate proficiency in each course learning outcome and integrate the learning outcomes in a relevant case study. To achieve a course pass, the completed portfolio must demonstrate course outcome proficiency according to the framework and criteria described above. Portfolios meeting these criteria will be submitted to a faculty subject matter expert for evaluation.

Prerequisites

Full admission into a CCO degree program, ENGL 111, ENGL 112, and approved PLA plan. Students within 12 credits of degree completion are not eligible to take CRIT 200.

Choose One:

Specific application of common tools for writing in the working world. Students will be instructed in rhetorical strategies of professional writing including style, report formats, editing, document design, and integration of visual aids. Students will complete a semester-long writing project; oral and written reports associated with the process of problem-solving within the project will be included.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

This course introduces students to the fundamental elements of technical writing (clear, concise, and targeted)that are common among seven forms of technical communication: email correspondence, editing,employment communication, proposals, long, formal reports,oral communication, and inventions. Through peer reviews and writing workshops, students develop the ability to write and edit text that precisely targets its audience. This course emphasizes deepening and broadening students' writing, speaking, and thinking abilities in a non-lecture-based, hands-on, discussion-centered classroom.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

Science Literacy Course (3 Credits):

Students will develop the ability to apply scientific methods to understand the natural world, to identify scientific aspects of daily life, and to evaluate the quality of scientific information based on its source and the methods used for its generation.

Choose One Human Thought & Creative Expression Course (3 Credits):

With pressure and release, a window opens and closes, recording light on a sensor. The simple action captures the instinct, judgement, and skill of the person behind the lens. This class will begin a study of the art and craft of photography. Students will develop their vision and their understanding of how to achieve it. Solid skills will be learned and many doors will be opened.

A survey of the continuing change experienced in art since the 15th century. Students will examine how an image is achieved as well as the significance of the subject represented. Individual inquiry concerning the nature of art is encouraged.

Students learn to appreciate films through the critical analysis of various elements of mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing and sound. The course introduces the conventions of classical Hollywood cinema, considers the work of one major director (auteur), and surveys selected international and independent films. Students view and discuss films each week.

Students in the course will explore the cultural history of the music genre broadly referred to as rock. Students will explore the social, economic and political contexts that are influenced by and that influenced each style in the United States. By listening, watching, reflecting upon, discussing and writing, students will explore how music takes on meaning, personally, and culturally. Topics and themes include the relationships between and among gospel, country, funk, folk, disco, rap and hip hop; the role of business and technology in those relationships, and political or transgressive elements of rock music.

Students will apply communication theory and research to address the particular challenges to communicating effectively in organizations. Students will learn how to identify organizational communication problems, analyze those problems, and generate effective solutions. Students will examine the relationship between organizational structure and specific communicative practices, and how communication practices by organizational members establish, maintain, or change organizational culture. They will also learn how to anticipate communication deficiencies in organizations, and use communication as a means to facilitate organizational development and innovation.

Prerequisites

Complete COMM-130 or COM-100.

Students will learn how to create conditions for successful conflict engagement, a necessary skill for any professional. The course focuses on the foundational capacities to remain calm and connected with oneself and others. In this state students can access helpful ideas and responses and be their best selves regardless of environment. Improving facility for conflict creates stronger relationships and reduces fear. By the end of the course, students will understand that disagreement and difference can become a source of personal and interpersonal growth.

Specific application of common tools for writing in the working world. Students will be instructed in rhetorical strategies of professional writing including style, report formats, editing, document design, and integration of visual aids. Students will complete a semester-long writing project; oral and written reports associated with the process of problem-solving within the project will be included.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

Students will study important themes in the social history of the United States since the Civil War. This course allows students to expand their critical thinking skills through an examination of primary and secondary sources. Themes might include: the evolving status of women; the immigrant experience; the concept of the American dream; the paradox of freedom vs. slavery; the minority experience; the tensions between social classes. Students will be evaluated primarily on writing assignments.

Students will become familiar with arguments originating from the following schools of ethics: virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism. Students will apply these ethical schools of thought to formulate arguments, practice deliberation and assess the implications of their decisions for various stakeholders in a professional context.

Prerequisites

Must have 75 completed credits or permission of Program Director.

This course introduces students to the fundamental elements of technical writing (clear, concise, and targeted)that are common among seven forms of technical communication: email correspondence, editing,employment communication, proposals, long, formal reports,oral communication, and inventions. Through peer reviews and writing workshops, students develop the ability to write and edit text that precisely targets its audience. This course emphasizes deepening and broadening students' writing, speaking, and thinking abilities in a non-lecture-based, hands-on, discussion-centered classroom.

Prerequisites

ENGL-112 or COR-125

Choose One Human Behavior & Social Institutions Course (3 Credits):

A survey of the science of psychology, including an overview of human behavior in various areas such as physiopsychology, development, learning social psychology, personality and abnormal behavior.

A study of human groups, culture, the self, and human interaction. The course focuses on contemporary American society and the influence of culture on our actions and beliefs, with the goal of fostering critical thinking about our social environment.

Provides a comprehensive analysis of the fundamentals of substantive criminal law. Students will learn the essential elements of crimes and the rationale underlying criminal law. The nature of jurisdiction, the criminal act, the criminal state of mind and matters affecting responsibility for criminal conduct are included.

This course focuses on the rules and procedures governing how the American criminal justice system must process individuals suspected, accused, and convicted of law violations.

This course provides students with a broad overview of the history, theory, and fundamentals of criminal investigation. Students are introduced to the basic responsibilities of investigators and protocols for report writing, evidence collection, and preparation of cases for trial. They also learn specific investigative techniques for different types of crimes, such as crimes involving violence and property, terrorism, and hate crimes, and, where appropriate, compare investigative protocols from other legal cultures.

Prerequisites

Take CRIM-120, CRIM-121.

Discusses the nature and method of economics with emphasis on microeconomic theory. Focus is on demand, supply, market equilibrium, elasticity, costs of production and resource pricing. Examines the market structures of pure competition, oligopoly and monopoly.

A general survey course that covers theories and applications of macroeconomics. Business firms, international economics, labor and government are included. Also examines monetary policy, taxes, public finances, economic output and growth, and international trade in the world economy.

Principles of Economics introduces the fundamental concepts of economics - the study of how people manage resources, and how they react to scarcity. This course focuses on both microeconomics (the behavior of consumers and companies) and macroeconomics (large-scale economic factors such as employment and interest rates), so that you'll gain a broad understanding of how a modern market economy functions, how decisions in business settings are informed by economics, and how economics applies to your everyday life.

Graduates of the marketing and communication bachelor's online program will demonstrate the following industry-specific skills, knowledge, and competencies:

  • Identify and explain marketing and communication principles and practices.
  • Apply current methods in marketing and communications, including software applications.
  • Conceptualize, design, and implement marketing and communications campaigns for a variety of audiences.
  • Integrate marketing and communication concepts that prioritize outcomes for organizations.
  • Analyze and evaluate marketing and communication strategies, including ethical and cultural perspectives.

As a student in the bachelor's degree in marketing communication you will earn multiple valuable digital marketing certifications including:

  • Google Analytics
  • Google Ads
  • Hubspot inbound, email, and content

Champlain College Online's marketing and communication faculty, led by Elaine Young, PhD, are expert practitioners in the field. Their industry expertise ensures that our curriculum is aligned with the needs of employers, and reflects the skills today’s marketing and communication professionals need for success. Classes led by our seasoned experts will give you real-world insight into the field, and create a rich community of career-focused learning.

Increasing your career mobility is at the center of everything we do. As an online bachelor's degree student, you get free access to the Fast Start Formula Career Course for getting noticed and getting hired, taught by Jen Morris, a leading executive career coach that partners with us to support our students in their job search journeys. This online course is self-paced and full of tips and tricks to land a job you'll love. Jen also hosts live webinars to answer specific questions, share additional insights, and does live "hot seat" coaching.

Tuition & Costs

Continuing your education is an investment in your future. Learn more about our affordable tuition rates.

Dare to Expect More of Champlain Online

Expect Convenience

Our programs are designed for busy adults. Go to school wherever and whenever is best for you, on the device of your choice.

Expect A Career Focus

Everything you learn in our online classrooms is relevant and immediately applicable to your work.

Expect Support

Your education journey is our priority and our student support team has your back every step of the way.

Expect Superior Faculty

Learn from practitioner faculty working in the field, with real-world experience and knowledge.

Meet the Program Director

Elaine Young, Program Director Marketing & Communication

Elaine Young

PhD
Program Director
  • Marketing & Communication (B.S.)

About

Dr. Elaine Young is a Professor and the Program Director for the B.S. in Marketing Communication program and Curriculum Innovation Faculty Lead at Champlain College Online. 

As program director, Dr. Young teaches courses and manages the faculty, curriculum, and assessment for the MarCom program. She also develops courses and teaches in the MBA program. As Curriculum Innovation Faculty Lead, Dr. Young supports creation of new curriculum offerings that serve both the needs of adults continuing their education and employers who need educational opportunities for their employees. Prior to her role in Champlain College Online, Dr. Young has been part of the Champlain College community since 2000 as a professor and faculty advisor for traditional on-campus students. She is a HubSpot Educator and a Certified Appreciative Advisor.

Dr. Young has a Ph.D. in Organizational Management from Capella University, where her dissertation research examined technology use and adoption of college students. In addition, she holds an M.S. in Internet Strategy Management from Marlboro College, a B.S. in Communication and Public Relations from SUNY Brockport and an A.S. in Communication from Genesee Community College. Dr. Young has over ten years of experience in the Marketing and Public Affairs profession, specializing in nonprofits. She is the author of “Tuned-in Family: How to Cope, Communicate and Connect in a Digital World” (2014).

 

 

Why Champlain

Tom Cianchetta, Bachelor's Degree in Business Management

Superior Faculty

"The classroom environment was great, and the faculty were very helpful in terms of reaching out and being available. All of my professors were willing and ready to call, email or text whenever I needed them."

Tom Cianchetta Bachelor's Degree in Business Management
Digital Sales Manager, Epsilon

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